Six and Out

This is a continuous series highlighting those persons who have made the journey back and are braving the struggle for liberation and a society where AfriKan values are exalted.

The Questions

  1. What is your Yoruba Name?
  2. What Orisa are at your head and what Shrines do you currently have?
  3. Are you an initiate of any other spiritual system?
  4. (a) How has your belief in Ifa affected your family have they supported your initiation?
    (b) What has been the general consensus about the person you are now from your family?
  5. What is the greatest lesson you have learned from Ifa?
  6. Lastly, what are some pertinent reading material you’d like to suggest to folks beginning in this cultural experience and or for those already steeply rooted?

____________________________________________________________

Eric Adewuyi Mason

1.What is your Yoruba Name?

Adewuyi

2. What Orisa are at your head and what Shrines do you currently have?

I am a child of Ifa. I have Esu Odara, Orisala, Ori, and of course Ifa. My wife, Olomide is consecrated to Osun and has Ori as well. My older son, Lari, was consecrated to Egbe Orun.

3. Are you an initiate of any other spiritual system?

No. I’m strictly Traditional Yoruba.

4. How has your belief in Ifa affected your family have they supported your initiation?

My family has been very supportive. My mother’s only concern was whether I was in a cult. Once I satisfied her that she was invited to any ritual or event she felt much more comfortable.

The consensus has been very favorable. My mother believes I am much more reliable and my older sister is more apt to follow my advice.

5. What is the greatest lesson you have learned from Ifa?

The greatest lesson I am learning is the value of calmness, tranquility in dealing with all things.

6. Lastly, what are some pertinent reading material you’d like to suggest to folks    beginning in this cultural experience and or for those already steeply rooted?

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Yoruba Culture: A Philosophical Approach by Kola Abimbola
Ifa: An Exposition of Ifa Literary Corpus by Wande Abimbola
Sixteen Great Poems of Ifa by Wande Abimbola
Fundamentals of the Yoruba Religion by Chief FAMA

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 Ifasayo Morenike Egunjobi

1.What is your Yoruba Name?

Ifasayo Morenike Egunjobi (Ifa begets Joy, I have found someone to pet, the ancestors gave birth to us all).

2. What Orisa are at your head and what Shrines do you currently have?

Osun and Ifa. One hand of Ifa, Esu, and Ogun.

3. Are you an initiate of any other spiritual system?

No

4. (a) How has your belief in Ifa affected your family have they supported your initiation?

My husband and children are all for it. The rest of my family is not aware. I want to tell them, but because of a past VERY negative experience with a Babalawo I don’t think they will understand it. I hope that as they see the positive changes there will be a door opened as to not cause a rift. As far as my husband and children are concerned, it has changed our lives wonderfully and dramatically. Our children commented some time ago that they felt we were better parents. That was proof enough for me.

5. What is the greatest lesson you have learned from Ifa?

The lesson that I am learning right now is to totally trust in Ifa. I am learning that I don’t have to handle everything myself.

6. Lastly, what are some pertinent reading material you’d like to suggest to folks    beginning in this cultural experience and or for those already steeply rooted?

Yoruba Theology and Tradition (trilogy) by Ayo Salami
Ifa Fundamentals by Chief FAMA.

I have some others, but those would’ve been better for me to start with.

Article by Olorisha Aboyade Bomani

Olorisha Aboyade Bomani (Mawiyah Kai EL-Jamah Bomani) is a native New Orleanian and Omo OYA. Mawiyah’s writings have appeared in The Crab Orchard Review,Dark ErosCatch The FireFreeform MagazineBeyond The FrontierKente ClothFertile GroundFamily Portraits,Chicken Bones: A Literary Journal, Survival Digest QuarterlyFrom A Bend In The River and Women’s Issues and Feminism in the 21st Century. She is co-writer/director of the play Brown Blood Black Womb and of the plays Hair AnthemSpring ChickensWhat Happens to Niggers in French Quarter Nightclubs and Hoodoo Gumbo. Olorisha Aboyade is an educator who currently resides in Shreveport, Louisiana.
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